How to Use a Jammerbugt to Hack and Spy on Your Competitors

So you’ve decided to become a digital Nomad and live your life online. Wonderful! You’ve got a laptop, a smartphone, and a good idea of what you want to do. And now you need a place to work. Where should you go? A garage is always a safe bet, but perhaps not the most exciting option. There’s another place you might want to consider – the office of a competitor.

What sort of competitors do you have in mind? Not your friends and family, your actual enemies. The people who are going to steal your customers and destroy your revenue stream. Those are the people you should be hacking. Whether they’re large tech companies or small businesses who are just getting started, there’s usually someone who wants to protect their ideas and inventions. And they will do anything to make sure you don’t get your hands on their intellectual property. (Not to mention the legal headaches that follow.)

So how exactly do you go about doing that? You may have thought about buying a jammerbugt, which is a device that disrupts wireless signals and forces them to re-transmit – hopefully giving you enough time to get the lay of the land and figure out their security protocols. But that’s not all it can do. It’s actually a very useful and affordable device for any hacker or spy. And it might just be the tool you need to get the information you desire.

The Many Forms Of A Jammerbugt

A jammerbugt is simply a wireless jammers + penetration tester in one. So you have a device that disrupts wireless signals (hence the name) and allows you to see what’s going on behind the scenes. With the right tools, you can see everything from login credentials to web servers and even the source code running on them. And it’s all completely transparent – giving you an unencrypted view into your target’s most intimate moments. (Which is probably why it’s such a popular tool among spies and hackers.)

What’s the matter? Don’t you want to protect your secrets? Sure, but how much do you really need to protect? How insecure are you really? In most cases, the more you know, the less you need to hide. And the reverse is usually true. (Unless, of course, you’re Robert Frost – keeping hidden while revealing. His poem “Michele” exemplifies this contradictory nature.) So what if someone you don’t know comes across your work? Will they know what it is? Will they figure it out? Yes, they will. Especially if you don’t change anything about it. (A good rule of thumb if you’re writing software is – always default to the user. This way, even if someone finds a bug, it won’t be obvious what it is until you explain what the code is supposed to do.)

On the other hand, what if you do want to keep something private? You can always use end-to-end encryption when sending messages through Signal or WhatsApp. And while it’s not possible to totally vanish online, it’s generally not necessary. In a world where privacy is under siege – perhaps you do need to keep some things to yourself. But you can also ensure that no one is snooping on your stuff without your permission. (It’s all about trust and who you allow to have access to your information. The more you trust, the less you need to keep hidden.)

So which is it? Do you need to keep something private, or do you want the world to know everything? In most cases, the answer is – it depends. (Though, in the interest of full disclosure, I’ll mention that most spies and hackers I know are partial to the former. Give them an unencrypted WiFi network, and they’ll be happy to share all your secrets with you. If, on the other hand, you do want to keep something private, they’ll happily help enforce your trust by keeping their hands off your stuff.)

How To Use A Jammerbugt

So you’ve decided to become a digital Nomad and live your life online. Wonderful! You’ve got a laptop, a smartphone, and a good idea of what you want to do. And now you need a place to work. Where should you go? A garage is always a safe bet, but perhaps not the most exciting option. There’s another place you might want to consider – the office of a competitor.

What sort of competitors do you have in mind? Not your friends and family, your actual enemies. The people who are going to steal your customers and destroy your revenue stream. Those are the people you should be hacking. Whether they’re large tech companies or small businesses who are just getting started, there’s usually someone who wants to protect their ideas and inventions. And they will do anything to make sure you don’t get your hands on their intellectual property. (Not to mention the legal headaches that follow.)

So how exactly do you go about doing that? You may have thought about buying a jammerbugt, which is a device that disrupts wireless signals and forces them to re-transmit – hopefully giving you enough time to get the lay of the land and figure out their security protocols. But that’s not all it can do. It’s actually a very useful and affordable device for any hacker or spy. And it might just be the tool you need to get the information you desire.

The Pros And Cons Of Using A Jammerbugt

Let’s start with the cons, because they’re pretty self-explanatory. First and foremost, this device is very expensive. A single unit will set you back thousands of dollars, and buying one for each computer you have isn’t exactly practical. (Though it is possible. There’s a type of wireless router that comes with a built-in jammerbugt, and it’s rather affordable if you only plan on using it for a single device.)

Then there’s the issue of power. You will need an external power supply to run this thing, and it doesn’t exactly slice into your mobile devices’ rechargeable batteries very effectively. (Though, to be fair, the power it draws is very minimal. So it’s not exactly taxing.)

On the other hand, the pros are rather self-explanatory as well. First and foremost, this device is extremely effective in preventing unauthorized access to your network. It can easily disrupt the various types of wireless access that your computer may be relying on (including Bluetooth, WiFi, and cellular) which makes it a dangerous tool to have around. (Though it should be noted that these days, with all the different types of access available, it may be a bit outdated. But that’s not the point.)

Additionally, you can use it to conduct security audits of your own network. (Which, in case you’re curious, is what it was originally designed for.) Since it is a completely open platform, you can download all the necessary tools to do your job from the internet – including a sniffer to see what’s going on with your network traffic, as well as Wifite, a wifi password hacker, and Cain & Abel, to see what secrets you can get about your wifi network. (Though there are also quite a few proprietary tools that can be run directly from the device.)

All in all, while it certainly has its perks, it’s not the most convenient device to have around. You will need to consider what you’re going to use it for and how much space you have available. If you decide to go the DIY route and build your own, you can take a look at the instructables for some useful tips.

Getting Our Hands On One

So let’s get the inevitable out of the way – if you’re reading this, you probably already know where I’m going with this. And you might be wondering if it’s possible to get your hands on one of these devices. The answer is – yes, it’s possible, though it’s not easy. (Especially since many sellers take advantage of the fact that a lot of people are after this device due to its popularity. It’s rather like Black Friday with electronics. Though admittedly not as devastating. At least for the vendors.)

In order to get hold of a jammerbugt, you’re going to have to enter a rather exclusive club – the club of cyber spies and crackers. Fortunately for you, I’m a member of this club, and I happen to have one sitting in my desk right now. So let’s see how to get access to it. (And while we’re at it, let’s cover some basic ground rules for the safety of both of us.)