What Is the Best Marketing Strategy for Camping Places?

You’ve decided to go on a holiday in a camper. Now what?

Camping is on the rise. In fact, the Global Camping Market is predicted to reach £12.8 billion by next year. As you’d expect, the growing trend is being driven by savvy millennials who want to travel smart and avoid the pricey tent camper holidays that flooded the market in the last couple of years.

But let’s face it, setting up your own camper isn’t easy. There are so many regulations that you have to follow. You’ll need a place to camp, which means finding a parking space. Then there’s the practicalities of cooking your own food and washing yourself and your clothes. It’s a lot to take in, especially if you’re new to the idea.

If you’re eager to hit the road in style, but don’t know where to start, continue reading.

The Rise In Camping

In the last decade, camping has become popularized by social media. Thanks to influencers like Nomad Capitalist and Instagrammers like @homedepotmaverick, who are documenting the process of setting up a travel trailer.

In the last couple of years, festivals and the need to plan ahead for luxury holidays no longer satisfy the generation of digitally influenced millennials who now populate the camping market. As a result, the number of people choosing to go green—and go mobile—is growing.

In 2022, there will be 1.7million new campers expected to hit the road. That’s a rise of 17% compared to 2021, and it represents a lucrative market for business owners who can provide the necessities for a mobile lifestyle.

The Nitty Gritty

If you decide to go the DIY route and build your own travel trailer, there are several things you need to know before you start digging up your backyard. First, make sure you have the required skills. If you’re not sure what some of these are, take a look at this post from the folks at travlere.com. It will give you an idea of what you’ll need to know to build your own camper. With some of the skills you’ll learn as part of the build, like electrical work and plumbing, you’ll be able to have a fully equipped camp that is ready to go whenever you are.

Next, decide on what size of travel trailer you need. The best rule of thumb is to pick a size that is two to three times your full height. This will ensure you have enough space for all your belongings and enable you to sleep comfortably. Fortunately for you, we’ve figured out the perfect ratio for your ultimate camping experience.

How to Make the Most of Your Camping Trip

Once you’ve set up your camping spot, the next step is to make the most of it. Make sure you bring things like:

  • A canopy (for sun protection)
  • A camp stove (for cooking meals)
  • A cooler (to keep your food cool)
  • A solar panel (to generate electricity)
  • A wind turbine (to generate electricity)
  • A rainwater tank (to collect water)
  • A bike (for getting around)
  • A sleeping mat
  • A pillow
  • A sleeping bag
  • A fishing rod (for catching fish)
  • A fishing net
  • A sledgehammer (for pounding poles)
  • A saw (for cutting wood)
  • A jigsaw (for cutting wood)
  • A brush (for cleaning)
  • A broom (for sweeping)
  • A bucket
  • A spade
  • A pair of gloves (for gardening)
  • A gas canister (for generating electricity)
  • A paracode (for paracetamol)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A flare (for signalling)
  • A torch (for signalling)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A flare (for signalling)
  • A torch (for signalling)
  • A solar panel (for generating electricity)
  • A water filter (for treating water)
  • A water bottle (for treating water)
  • A water jug (for treating water)
  • A torch (for signalling)
  • A flare (for signalling)
  • A solar panel (for generating electricity)
  • A gas canister (for generating electricity)
  • A paracode (for paracetamol)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A jigsaw (for cutting wood)
  • A sledgehammer (for pounding poles)
  • A saw (for cutting wood)
  • A brush (for cleaning)
  • A bucket
  • A spade
  • A gas canister (for generating electricity)
  • A paracode (for paracetamol)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A jigsaw (for cutting wood)
  • A sledgehammer (for pounding poles)
  • A saw (for cutting wood)
  • A brush (for cleaning)
  • A bucket
  • A spade
  • A jigsaw (for cutting wood)
  • A sledgehammer (for pounding poles)
  • A saw (for cutting wood)
  • A brush (for cleaning)
  • A gas canister (for generating electricity)
  • A paracode (for paracetamol)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A flare (for signalling)
  • A torch (for signalling)
  • A solar panel (for generating electricity)
  • A water filter (for treating water)
  • A water bottle (for treating water)
  • A water jug (for treating water)
  • A torch (for signalling)
  • A flare (for signalling)
  • A solar panel (for generating electricity)
  • A gas canister (for generating electricity)
  • A paracode (for paracetamol)
  • A whistle (for signalling)
  • A jigsaw (for cutting wood)
  • A sledgehammer (for pounding poles)
  • A saw (for cutting wood)
  • A brush (for cleaning)
  • A bucket
  • A spade

Hopefully, these tips will give you an idea of what you need to consider so you can have an enjoyable and safe camping trip. If you’re planning to go green and reduce your footprint while traveling, consider how you can re-use or recycle items you already have at home and are not using (like your cell phone or laptop). Remember to be frugal and creative while still having fun! Good luck out there on the road, and I hope this article will help you find the perfect way to enjoy your travel experience.