How to Market Yourself Online: A Guide for Newbies

Marketing yourself online can seem tricky. After all, you’re competing not only with brands but with gamers, influencers, and even your friends’ Instagram stories.

The good news is that you don’t need to be a professional marketer or have huge budgets to effectively market yourself online. As a matter of fact, you can use free tools, platforms, and software to reach your full potential. Let’s take a look at how to market yourself online, step by step.

1. Define your perfect audience.

Think of several demographics you feel will benefit the most from your content. This includes people with a specific interest in your niche, as well as those who fit the demographics of your target audience. For example, if you’re an accountant, but you market yourself online as a novelist, you’ll want to focus on both small and large businesses.

When selecting the demographics you’ll target with your content, be realistic about your own reach. How large is your audience? How much potential do you believe there is for your product or service in your chosen niche? These are important questions to ask yourself before you start creating content.

2. Identify the topic of your next blog post.

Keeping your eye on the ball, you want to continue identifying the topic of your next blog post. When choosing a topic for your blog, it’s important to keep the reader in mind. What do they want to learn about? What are their questions?

After you’ve got a few posts under your belt, you’ll start to notice a pattern of topics. The ones that seem to be most popular with your audience are worth revisiting. These are topics that you could write about in the near future, and the more you write about them, the more opportunities you could gain. Don’t be afraid to take a long time brainstorming ideas for your next blog post. You can also use tools like The Brainstorm Tool to help you along. Finally, make sure the topic you choose is both interesting and relevant to your audience. If it’s not, there’s no point writing about it. Your blog post may also be the most influential piece of content your audience will ever read.

3. Create a buyer persona.

Now that you’ve got an idea of your target audience, it’s time to create a buyer persona. A buyer persona is a representation of a particular type of customer you’re designing your product or service to meet. When developing your buyer persona, you’ll want to consider several factors. First, what do you know about them? Second, what do they care about?

Based on your knowledge of your target audience and what they care about, you can create a clear picture of who they are, what their needs are, and what their behavior is like. The clearer you are about your buyer persona, the better. Once you’ve got a clear picture in mind, it’s much easier to determine what content and messaging you should deliver to satisfy them. This will also make it much easier to gain traction with your audience and establish yourself as an authoritative voice in your chosen niche. If you want to learn more, here are a few helpful tips on how to create a buyer persona.

4. Understand the value proposition.

The value proposition is the pitch for your product or service, distilled into a single sentence. In marketing, we often use the word ‘value’ to refer to the perceived benefits a product or service provides. In other words, the pitch for your product or service. In this case, the value proposition is exactly that – the value your product or service provides to the consumer. In the following example, the value proposition for the Simple Ledger System is summarized in one sentence: “With the Simple Ledger System, creating a simple business accounting plan is as easy as 1-2-3.”

To learn more, check out this widely-used and free Value Proposition Analysis tool.

5. Set a pricing structure for your product or service.

Setting a pricing structure is one of the most important things you need to do before you start marketing your product or service. Essentially, pricing is the cost of the product or service. Once you’ve set the price, you can more easily determine how much you should charge your audience. If you want to learn more, here are a few helpful tips for setting a pricing structure. First, try to align your pricing with industry standards or at least with what you perceive to be the accepted market rate. In the example above, we’ve used the industry standard of $97/mo as a basis for our pricing. However, you’re not bound to use industry standards as a basis for your pricing. Ultimately, you want to set a price that is both fair and reasonable for your product.

6. Design a compelling call-to-action.

A call-to-action is a prompt or suggestion to take a specific action. Calls-to-action can be as simple as “read this article” to “visit our website” or “sign up for our newsletter”. When creating your call-to-action, keep in mind that your call-to-action should not only provide potential customers with enough information to take action, but it should also provide them with the motivation to take action. In our example above, we’ve used “Get started today” as the call-to-action. Not only does this provide our audience with the motivation to take action, but it also gives them an idea of what they’ll find on our website if they click the link.

7. Customize your website URL.

With your product or service in mind, it’s time to take a look at your website. First, find your domain name. A domain name is the address of your website. This is the unique string of letters and numbers that will be connected to your website, such as “bradford.com”. In this example, “bradford.com” is the domain name.

Once you’ve got your domain name, it’s time to move on to the next step. Create a landing page, otherwise known as a static or splash page. A splash page is a web page that will display content in a seamless, uninterrupted flow. Ideally, you want to create a single page that will convince your audience to subscribe to your newsletter or to visit your website. In our example, we’ve used WordPress to create a fully-functioning blog. However, you can use any content-managed platform you wish to create your landing page. Just make sure that it’s equipped with a contact form so that you can collect emails.

When you’ve got your landing page, it’s time to move on to the final step. Create a one-page website mockup. A one-page website mockup is simply a visual representation of your finished product. In other words, it’s a blueprint for how your website will look like. A one-page website mockup will help you evaluate the layout and design of your site, as well as the overall user experience. In our example, we’ve used Squarespace to create a one-page website mockup.

With your product or service in mind, it’s time to take a look at your website. First, find your domain name. A domain name is the address of your website. This is the unique string of letters and numbers that will be connected to your website, such as “bradford.com”. In this example, “bradford.com” is the domain name.

Once you’ve got your domain name, it’s time to move on to the next step. Create a landing page, otherwise known as a static or splash page. A splash page is a web page that will display content in a seamless, uninterrupted flow. Ideally, you want to create a single page that will convince your audience to subscribe to your newsletter or to visit your website. In our example, we’ve used WordPress to create a fully-functioning blog. However, you can use any content-managed platform you wish to create your landing page. Just make sure that it’s equipped with a contact form so that you can collect emails.

When you’ve got your landing page, it’s time to move on to the final step. Create a one-page website mockup. A one-page website mockup is simply a visual representation of your finished product. In other words, it’s a blueprint for how your website will look like. A one-page website mockup will help you evaluate the layout and design of your site, as well as the overall user experience. In our example, we’ve used Squarespace to create a one-page website mockup.