How to Use JML to Boost Your Online Marketing

Java model-view-controller (JML) is a framework that makes it easy to build web applications that adapt to any screen size. You can use this powerful tool to build any kind of application — from a simple todo list to a complex order processor — with just a few lines of code!

But perhaps the greatest thing about JML is that it can be used in an online marketing application to create highly interactive landing pages that adapt to any screen size. This is ideal for those looking to engage with — or sell to — customers through the web.

In this article, we’ll discuss how you can use JML to build a simple yet highly functional online store that you can use to promote your products or services. We’ll cover the following topics:

Setting Up A Product Landing Page

Navigating the complex world of e-commerce and online marketing can be daunting, especially if you have little to no experience in programming or designing websites. That’s why we’ve gone above and beyond what’s needed to make your first product landing page as simple and easy to understand as possible. So you can easily replicate the setup process to grow your online store.

You’ll want to set up your product landing page with these essentials:

  • A descriptive title
  • Product images
  • A pricing table
  • A feature list
  • A call to action
  • A summary of the contents
  • Blog articles
  • Social media icons
  • Contact details

With these components, you can fully replicate our example product page from Square Inc. with just a few clicks. We’ve provided all the code snippets needed to make this happen (you don’t need an e-commerce platform to run a store like this).

Make sure to test the product landing page you create against a different screen size to see how it handles various device orientations. You can use one of the many tooling services available to test mobile friendliness of your site.

Setting Up A Review Landing Page

Once you’ve created a product landing page, you can move onto the next logical step: reviews. Building a review landing page is similar to setting up a product landing page, but with a few key differences:

  • Product reviews are an important part of any e-commerce or online store marketing plan. With a little creativity, you can integrate various review platforms like Google Reviews, Apple App Store reviews, or Amazon reviews into your site.
  • Unlike product reviews, which are often useful to potential customers, blog reviews that critique your products can also be considered marketing material for your competitors.
  • Reviews can help build credibility by demonstrating that others believe in your product. They also serve as a means to engage with consumers and gather valuable information about your audience’s behavior.
  • Depending on how objective you want your reviews to be, you can choose from various review platforms that allow you to moderate your reviews — allowing you to set the tone for the experience and respond to specific concerns.

To replicate our example review page from Square Inc., first you’ll want to set up a product review landing page. Then, you’ll want to populate it with content from various review platforms (e.g., Amazon).

You’ll need to add the review platform’s script (e.g., the ReviewWon tag from Amazon) to your product landing page. This will automatically pull the product review count and the latest review into your site.

As with any other piece of content on your site, you can use the H1 and H2 headings to create a hierarchy of text on your product review page. You can also add your own custom CSS to make the page more appealing to your audience.

Setting Up A Landing Page For Customer Service

No product or website launch is complete without a call to action. On a customer service page, this could be as easy as providing a contact form or page where users can receive support from your company. However, you can also use this space to introduce customers to additional products or services that might be of interest to them. This is where product recommendations come in.

To create a customer service landing page, you’ll first want to set up a general purpose landing page. Then, you’ll want to add a simple contact form with an email address and phone number. Finally, you can add relevant products or services that your audience has an interest in based on their behavior on your site.

You can give additional emphasis to certain products or services by adding a feature image and a short description. You can also use the space to introduce users to additional products or services that might be of interest to them.

Once you’ve populated your customer service landing page with these essentials, you can fully replicate our example customer service page from Square Inc. with just a few clicks. We’ve provided all the code snippets needed to make this happen (you don’t need an e-commerce platform to run a store like this).

Make sure to test the customer service landing page you create against a different screen size to see how it handles various device orientations. You can use one of the many tooling services available to test mobile friendliness of your site.